Random House Digital

  • In 1953, in the presence of an investigator, Aldous Huxley took four-tenths of a gramme of mescalin, sat down and waited to see what would happen. When he opened his eyes everything was transformed. Huxley described his experience in The Doors of Perception and its sequel Heaven and Hell.

  • Anglais Hooking Up

    Tom Wolfe

    In Hooking Up Tom Wolfe ranges from coast to coast, observing the 'lurid carnival actually taking place in the mightiest country on earth in the year 2000' - everything from teenage sexual manners to how genetics and neuroscience are changing the way we regard ourselves. Also included in this collection are some of his most classic and enduring pieces of journalism, and 'Ambush art at Fort Bragg', his fiercely satirical novella about sting TV.



    Funny, often savagely so, hard-hitting and wise, Wolfe remains a unique master-chronicler of America and its future.

  • Anglais The Broken Estate

    James Wood

    In a series of long essays, James Wood examines the connection between literature and religious belief, in a startlingly wide group of writers. Wood re-appraises the writing of such figures as Thomas More, Jane Austen, Herman Melville, Anton Chekhov, Thomas Mann, Nikolai Gogol, Gustave Flaubert and Virginia Woolf, vigorously reading them against the grain of received opinion, and illuminatingly relating them to questions of religious and phiosophical belief Contemporary writers, such as Martin Amis, Thomas Pynchon and George Steiner, are also discussed, with the boldness and attention to language that have made Wood such an influential and controversial figure. Writing here about his own childhood struggle to believe, Wood says that 'the child of evangelism if he does not believe, inherits nevertheless a suspicion of indifference. ' Wood brings that suspicion to bear on literture itself. The result is a unique book of criticism. Illuminating and exciting and compelling. . . one never doubts the soundness of his judgements. . . There is wonderful writing throughout this collection.

  • Presents a collection of essays and reviews on miscellaneous topics involving American culture and intellectual life by the American novelist.

  • Following The Broken Estate, The Irresponsible Self, and How Fiction Works - books that established James Wood as the leading critic of his generation - The Fun Stuff confirms Wood's pre-eminence, not only as a discerning judge but also as an appreciator of the contemporary novel.



    In twenty-three passionate, sparkling dispatches - that range over such crucial writers as Thomas Hardy, Leo Tolstoy, and Edmund Wilson - Wood offers a panoramic look at the modern novel. He effortlessly connects his encyclopaedic, eloquent understanding of the literary canon with an equally in-depth analysis of the most important authors writing today, including Cormac McCarthy, Kazuo Ishiguro, and V.S. Naipaul.



    Included in The Fun Stuff are the title essay on Keith Moon and the lost joys of drumming - which was a finalist for last year's National Magazine Awards - as well as Wood's essay on George Orwell, which Christopher Hitchens selected for the Best American Essays 2010. The Fun Stuff is indispensable reading for anyone who cares about contemporary literature.

  • A definitive anthology containing all of the author's essays encompasses his early travel sketches of Brooklyn, New Orleans, and Hollywood; portraits of Isak Dinesen, Mae West, Humphrey Bogart, and Marilyn Monroe; accounts of the filming of "In Cold Blood;" autobiographical musings; and the recently discovered "Remembering Willa Cather."

  • In a series of long essays, James Wood examines the connection between literature and religious belief, in a startlingly wide group of writers. Wood re-appraises the writing of such figures as Thomas More, Jane Austen, Herman Melville, Anton Chekhov, Thomas Mann, Nikolai Gogol, Gustave Flaubert and Virginia Woolf, vigorously reading them against the grain of received opinion, and illuminatingly relating them to questions of religious and phiosophical belief Contemporary writers, such as Martin Amis, Thomas Pynchon and George Steiner, are also discussed, with the boldness and attention to language that have made Wood such an influential and controversial figure. Writing here about his own childhood struggle to believe, Wood says that 'the child of evangelism if he does not believe, inherits nevertheless a suspicion of indifference. ' Wood brings that suspicion to bear on literture itself. The result is a unique book of criticism. Illuminating and exciting and compelling. . . one never doubts the soundness of his judgements. . . There is wonderful writing throughout this collection.

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