• Savez-vous que la lumière d'aujourd'hui a 30 000 ans ? Que l'énergie électrique d'un seul moustique peut suffire à provoquer une extinction de masse ? Que l'Univers a peut-être au moins 10 dimensions ? Qu'il est peuplé d'un nombre infini ni de copies de vous-même ?
    Beaucoup de faits dans notre monde semblent parfaitement établis, et d'importantes avancées scientifiques nous ont aidés à nous comprendre nous-mêmes, ainsi que notre planète et notre place dans le cosmos. Mais nos aventures dans l'espace, notre compréhension approfondie du monde quantique et les énormes progrès technologiques réalisés au cours du siècle dernier ont également révélé un Univers bien plus étrange que nous n'aurions jamais pu l'imaginer.
    L'Infini au creux de votre main est un voyage fascinant à travers 50 faits scientifiques parmi les plus extraordinaires à observer. Avec humour et clarté, Marcus Chown y examine des vérités profondes qui régissent notre quotidien et nous aide à comprendre l'immense complexité de notre existence.

  • The two towering achievements of modern physics are quantum theory and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Together, they explain virtually everything about the world we live in. But, almost a century after their advent, most people haven't the slightest clue what either is about.Did you know that there's so much empty space inside matter that the entire human race could be squeezed into the volume of a sugar cube? Or that you grow old more quickly on the top floor of a building than on the ground floor? And did you realize that 1% of the static on a TV tuned between stations is the relic of the Big Bang? Marcus Chown, the bestselling author of What A Wonderful World and the Solar System app, explains all with characteristic wit, colour and clarity, from the Big Bang and Einstein's general theory of relativity to probability, gravity and quantum theory. 'Chown discusses special and general relativity, probablity waves, quantum entanglement, gravity and the Big Bang, with humour and beautiful clarity, always searching for the most vivid imagery.' Steven Poole, Guardian

  • Marcus Chown's highly accessible exploration of reality, the nature of the universe, and the place of life within it. Starting with the questions being asked by the world's most daring and imaginative scientists, he takes us to the frontier of science and reveals that the mysteries being examined there are those that matter most to all of us: could we live for ever? where did we come from? and what the hell are we doing here?

  • Anglais The Magic Furnace

    Marcus Chown

    Every atom in our bodies has an extraordinary history. Our blood, our food, our books, our clothes - everything contains atoms forged in blistering furnaces deep inside stars, which were blown into space by those stars' cataclysmic explosions and deaths. From red giants - stars so enormous they could engulf a million suns - to supernova explosions - the most violent events in the universe - the birth of every atom was marked by cosmic events on an enormous scale, against a backdrop of unimaginable heat and cold, brightness and darkness, space and time. But how did we discover the astonishing truth about our cosmic origins? THE MAGIC FURNACE is Marcus Chown's extraordinary account of how scientists unravelled the mystery of atoms, and helped to explain the dawn of life. It is one of the greatest detective stories in the history of science. In fact, it is two puzzles intertwined, for the stars contain the key to unlocking the secret of atoms, and the atoms the solution to the secret of stars.

  • The scientists who first detected the cosmic radiation, that was identified as the afterglow of the big bang, had to admit that it was more by accident than intention. This title explains one of the biggest discoveries in modern science - and presents a picture of what happened next.

  • Look around you. The reflection of your face in a window tells you that the universe is orchestrated by chance. The iron in a spot of blood on your finger tells you that somewhere out in space there is furnace at a temperature of 4.5 billion degrees. Your TV tells you that the universe had a beginning.

    In fact, your very existence tells you that this may not be the only universe but merely one among an infinity of others, stacked like the pages of a never-ending book.

    Marcus Chown, author of Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt You, takes familiar features of the world we know and shows how they can be used to explain profound truths about the ultimate nature of reality. His new book will change the way you see the world: with Chown as your guide, cutting-edge science is made clear and meaningful by a falling leaf, or a rose, or a starry night sky…

  • In 140 pages, two masterly popularisers present 140 explanations of the biggest questions in physics - in the form of 10 or so tweets per page. They set themselves the challenge of boiling down what is essential on each subject into sentences of 140 characters, and the results are both entertaining and brilliantly informative. Not a word is wasted. The reader is not patronized and learns something on every page. If only all science writing could be so precise and so economical. Only science writers of a very high calibre could achieve such compression. Marcus Chown - 'the finest cosmology writer of our day' (Matt Ridley) - has known the Dutch writer Govert Schilling for twenty years. Schilling pioneered this very swift form of explanation in a Dutch newspaper, and suggested to Chown that they collaborate on bringing it to a wider audience. Tweeting the Universe is unlike any other science book.

  • Why do we breathe? What is money? How does the brain work? Why did life invent sex? Does time really exist? How does capitalism work - or not, as the case may be? Where do mountains come from? How do computers work? How did humans get to dominate the Earth? Why is there something rather than nothing? In What a Wonderful World, Marcus Chown, bestselling author of Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt You and the Solar System app, uses his vast scientific knowledge and deep understanding of extremely complex processes to answer simple questions about the workings of our everyday lives. Lucid, witty and hugely entertaining, it explains the basics of our essential existence, stopping along the way to show us why the Atlantic is widening by a thumbs' length each year, how money permits trade to time travel why the crucial advantage humans had over Neanderthals was sewing and why we are all living in a giant hologram.

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