• Neoliberal Culture presents a critical analysis of the impact of the global free-market - the hegemony of which has been described elsewhere by the author as 'a short counter-revolution' - on the arts, media and everyday life since the 1970s.

  • Cultural Methodologies illustrates the distinctiveness and coherence of cultural studies as a site of interaction between the humanities and the social sciences.

    Topics covered include: the relationship between critical theory and cultural studies; the pragmatics of cultural research and education; ethical questions and research purposes; the role of feminism in cultural studies; the uses of autobiography; the analysis of city cultures; textual analysis and ethnographic procedures; constructions of identity in relation to `race', sexuality and nationhood; the use of qualitative and quantitative data; and some of the main issues involved in generating research findings for a thesis or other publication.

    The book is written for students either commencing or intending to do research in cultural studies. It stresses how necessary it is to consider and plan very carefully the rationales and principles in research while avoiding the straitjacket of `methodolatory'.

  • 'Jim McGuigan has done it again. The complex cultural machinery hiding behind the apparently simple 'facts of life' still fresh in our collective memory, has been pulled out from its hiding, exposed, disassembled and put together again, and showed in action of shaping up its products; all that done to the benefit of us all - simultaneously producers and product of the life we share. Another great contribution to cultural studies; and to our understanding of the world notorious for defying/escaping understanding. This is exactly what we need 'cultural analysis' for' - Professor Zygmunt Bauman, Emeritus Professor of Sociology, University of Leeds

    'Jim McGuigan is one of cultural studies' leading practitioners. This volume is a generous and wide-reaching exploration of how to use cultural theory to explore a wide variety of topics, brought together under the sign of the struggle for a vigorous, participatory public sphere' - Toby Miller, University of California

    This book represents a distinctive approach to cultural analysis, using multi-dimensional methods for addressing issues of public interest.

    Stressing the impact of both neoliberalism and the formation of a 'cool capitalist culture' that has colonised everyday life around much of the globe, Jim McGuigan deploys his original concept of the 'cultural public sphere' within several carefully analysed case studies, including:

    o celebrity death
    o festivals and urban regeneration
    o 'race' and multicultural controversy
    o popular television
    o social significance of the all purpose mobile communication device in a privatised and individualised way of life
    o riskiness and uncertainty in the creative and media industries

    This is a radical intervention in the research agendas and conceptual development of cultural policy studies, cultural sociology and, more generally, in the broad field known as 'cultural studies'. It offers challenging theoretical arguments that are substantiated with concrete evidence of cultural and social processes.

  • "Raymond Williams: A Short Counter-Revolution amply demonstrates the continuing relevance of Williams's analysis, from the early 1980s, to our current situation. After thirty years of neoliberalism his insights still read as freshly and as incisively as they first did. Jim McGuigan's new chapter explicitly extends the lines of continuity from then to now, in a persuasive and at times appropriately critical way. Williams's concluding chapter, Resources for a Journey of Hope remains as inspiring, and as necessary, as ever."
    - Simon Dentith, University of Reading
    "It's great that Towards 2000 is revisited. Jim McGuigan's preface to this edition and his remarkable up-dating chapter A Short Counter Revolution draw upon a formidable range of references to illustrate why this work is as fresh and insightful today as it was 30 years ago."
    - Derek Tatton, www.raymondwilliamsfoundation.org.uk  
    'Culture,' wrote Raymond Williams, `is one of the most complicated words in the English language.'  Ironically, the most important British writer on culture in the post-war period is also one of the most poorly digested among today's readers.  
    Originally conceived as the sequel to his 1961 The Long Revolution,  Williams' 1983 title Towards 2000 has been unfairly classified as a period piece. With the permission of the Williams Estate, the book has been re-entitled A Short Counter-Revolution - Towards 2000 Revisited, with noted Williams expert Jim McGuigan adding a chapter that updates the original with a survey of developments since its publication, par­ticularly concerning the impact of neoliberalism, a phenomenon sighted early by Raymond Williams and named `Plan X'.
    In this new edition, Jim McGuigan makes a totally convincing case to read the book as a contemporary classic.  It remains an indispensable guide to:

    Power and inequality
    Class politics
    Post-industrial society
    Globalization
    The crisis in democracy

  • Is There a Purpose to Suffering And Loss? We only have to live to see or experience how agonizing life can be. We are surrounded by child abuse and neglect, starving families, premature deaths of those we love, natural disasters and global disease. How could a God worthy of respect and worship allow such a world to exist?
    There are no simple answers. But there is hope. For, claims author Jim McGuiggan, suffering may in fact be the last thing we expect-an expression of God's wrath, which in turn is nothing other than his relentless, loving pursuit of us. If this is true, then suffering is a vital part of God's work to redeem his creation. Give this claim a hearing, and you just might see the suffering world in a new way-a world shot through with glory and hope and assurance.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Information and communication technologies are said to be transforming urban life dramatically and bringing about rapid economic and cultural globalization. This book explores the many fascinating and urgent issues involved by relating advanced theoretical debates to practical matters of communication with cultural policy. It maps out a range of `optimistic' and `pessimistic' scenarios with special regard to various forms of inequality, particularly class, gender and geopolitical. Topics discussed include urban planning, virtual cities and actual cities, economic and political policy, and critical social analysis of current trends that are of momentous consequence. The book concludes that it is necessary to bring together a number of differently informing approaches, cultural, economic, political and technological, to make sense of a field of dynamic and contradictory forces.

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