• Girl

    Edna O'Brien

    Le nouveau roman d’Edna O’Brien laisse pantois. S’inspirant de l’histoire des lycéennes enlevées par Boko Haram en 2014, l’auteure irlandaise se glisse dans la peau d’une adolescente nigériane. Depuis l’irruption d’hommes en armes dans l’enceinte de l’école, on vit avec elle, comme en apnée, le rapt, la traversée de la jungle en camion, l’arrivée dans le camp, les mauvais traitements, et son mariage forcé à un djihadiste – avec pour corollaires le désarroi, la faim, la solitude et la terreur.
    Le plus difficile commence pourtant quand la protagoniste de ce monologue halluciné parvient à s’évader, avec l’enfant qu’elle a eue en captivité. Celle qui, à sa toute petite fille, fera un soir dans la forêt un aveu déchirant – « Je ne suis pas assez grande pour être ta mère » – finira bien, après des jours de marche, par retrouver les siens. Et comprendre que rien ne sera jamais plus comme avant : dans leur regard, elle est devenue une « femme du bush », coupable d’avoir souillé le sang de la communauté.
    Prix Femina spécial 2019 pour l’ensemble de son œuvre.

    Traduit par : Aude de Saint-Loup
    © Sabine Wespieser éditeur, 2019 © Edna O'Brien, 2019
    © et (P) Audiolib, 2020
    Durée : 5h52

  • Edna O'Brien's wonderful, wild and moving novel shocked the nation on its publication in 1960. Adapted for the stage by the author, The Country Girls, the play, is a highly theatrical and free-flowing telling of this classic coming of age story.

  • Anglais A Pagan Place

    Edna O'Brien

    A PAGAN PLACE is Edna O'Brien's true novel of Ireland. Here she returns to that uniquely wonderful, terrible, peculiar place she once called home and writes not only of a life there--of the child becoming a woman--but of the Irish experience out of which that life arises--perhaps more pointedly than in any of her other works. This is the Ireland of country villages and barley fields, of druids in the woods, of unknown babies in the womb, of mischievous girls and Tans with guns. Ireland has marked Edna O'Brien's life and work with unmistakable color and depth, and here she recreates her homeland with a singular grace and intensity.

  • Anglais The Light of Evening

    Edna O'Brien

    In this contemporary story with universal resonance, Edna O'Brien delves deep into the intense relationship that exists between a mother and daughter who long for closeness yet remain eternally at odds.
    From her hospital bed in Dublin, the ailing Dilly Macready eagerly awaits a visit from her long-estranged daughter, Eleanora. Years before, Eleanora fled Ireland for London when her sensuous first novel caused a local scandal. Eleanora's peripatetic life since then has brought international fame but personal heartbreak in her failed quest for love. Always, her mother beseeches her to return home, sending letters that are priceless in their mix of love, guilt, and recrimination. For all her disapproval, Dilly herself knows something of Eleanora's need for freedom: as a young woman in the 1920s, Dilly left Ireland for a new life in New York City. O'Brien's marvelous cinematic portrait of New York in that era is a tour-de-force, filled with the clang and clatter of the city, the camaraderie of the working girls against their callous employers, and their fierce competition over handsome young men. But a lover's betrayal sent Dilly reeling back to Ireland to raise a family on a lovely old farm named Rusheen. It is Rusheen that still holds mother and daughter together.
    Yet Eleanora's visit to her mother's sickbed does not prove to be the glad reunion that Dilly prayed for. And in her hasty departure, Eleanora leaves behind a secret journal of their stormy relationship -- a revelation that brings the novel to a shocking close.
    Brimming with the lyricism and earthy insight that are the hallmarks of Edna O'Brien's acclaimed fiction, The Light of Evening is a novel of dreams and attachments, lamentations and betrayals. At its core is the realization that the bond between mother and child is unbreakable, stronger even than death.

  • When a wanted war criminal, masquerading as a healer, settles in a small west coast Irish village, the community are in thrall. One woman, Fidelma McBride, falls under his spell and in this searing novel, Edna O'Brien charts the consequence of that fatal attraction. This is a story about love, the artifice of evil and the terrible necessity of accountability in our shattered, damaged world. It has been ten years since the last novel from Edna O'Brien and The Little Red Chairs reminds us why she is felt to be one of the great Irish writers, of any generation. The Little Red Chairs may be her masterpiece.

  • Anglais Country Girl

    O'Brien Edna

    I thought of life's many bounties, to have known the extremities of joy and sorrow, love, crossed love and unrequited love, success and failure, fame and slaughter, to have read in the newspapers that as a writer I was past my sell-by date, yet regardless, to go on writing and reading, to be lucky enough to live in these two intensities that have buttressed my whole life.Born in Ireland in 1930 and driven into exile after publication of her controversial first novel, The Country Girls, O'Brien has created a body of work which bears comparison with the very best writers of the twentieth century.In Country Girl we come face to face with literary life of high drama and contemplation. And along the way there are encounters with Hollywood giants, pop stars and literary titans -- all of whom lend this life, so gorgeously, sometimes painfully remembered here, a terrible poignancy.In prose which sparkles with the effortless gifts of a master in her ninth decade, Edna O'Brien has recast her life with the imaginitive insight of a poet. It is a book of unfathomable depths and honesty.

  • Collected here together for the first time in one beauitful volume, are the stories of an expert practitioner of the shorter form. Spanning five decades of writing, The Love Object takes the most memorable and successful stories from collections like A Scandalous Woman and Saints and Sinners; stories that have bewitched generation after generation.Referred to in the New York Review of Books by Harold Bloom as 'the short story master', Edna O'Brien's stories are a cumulative portrait of a nation, seen from within and without. Here you will find stories about families, feuds, love and land; enchantment, disenchantment, and throughout, the manifold bonds of love. Here are stories about the tension between country and city life, the instinct towards escape and nostaglia for home; and always the shimmering, potent prose.

  • Anglais Night

    O'Brien Edna

    Edna O'Brien's classic, rocket of a novel, Night, is narrated by one of her most memorably, unhinged characters, Mary Hooligan. Lying on a four-poster bed, unable to sleep, she recounts (mis)adventures, courtships, and sexual encounters of the most transgressive kind, in a narrative voice of blistering originality.Out of print for some time, and now made available in the wake of O'Brien's bestselling memoir, Country Girl, Night is a novel which introduces us to one of the most compelling and garrulous narrators in modern fiction.

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