SAGE Publications Ltd

  • Drawing on a wealth of local, national and international sources, unpublished documents and original research, this book provides a theoretical and practical critique of victimology.

    The authors outline and discuss the issues facing victims today and address the fundamental question: How can we best ensure justice for victims, while at the same time preserving the rights of defendants? The search for answers raises other key questions: What are the risks of crime and do they vary from country to country? What is the impact of crime on the victim? How are victims treated by police, welfare agencies and courts? Why have governments become interested in victims? Can we learn from the experiences of policies in other nations? How are services developing in the rest of the world, including Eastern Europe?

    This critical and comparative analysis of `victim services' offers important insights for students and academics in criminology, social work and social policy, as well as for victim support workers.

  • Cultural Methodologies illustrates the distinctiveness and coherence of cultural studies as a site of interaction between the humanities and the social sciences.

    Topics covered include: the relationship between critical theory and cultural studies; the pragmatics of cultural research and education; ethical questions and research purposes; the role of feminism in cultural studies; the uses of autobiography; the analysis of city cultures; textual analysis and ethnographic procedures; constructions of identity in relation to `race', sexuality and nationhood; the use of qualitative and quantitative data; and some of the main issues involved in generating research findings for a thesis or other publication.

    The book is written for students either commencing or intending to do research in cultural studies. It stresses how necessary it is to consider and plan very carefully the rationales and principles in research while avoiding the straitjacket of `methodolatory'.

  • The Health Care Policy Process enables the reader to develop an understanding of the scope and objectives of health policy studies, an analysis of the extent to which policies can be changed or influenced by those involved at the different stages of the policy process and the ability to assess both the need and the scope for change.

    Taking as her starting point an analysis of the health care system and the dynamics of the policy process, Carol Barker considers the relationship between planning and policy. Providing a working knowledge of the different ways in which policy issues may be analysed, the book sets out the problems involved in attempting to assess the views of different interest groups, and stresses the importance of supporting an active process of policy development.

    Carol Barker goes on to look at key concepts in analysing health care issues and examines some of the debates overshadowing today's health policy agenda, in part as set by international agencies and in part as set by developing nations themselves. She emphasizes the importance of understanding the dimensions of these issues in a way which will help those organizing health care to think strategically about the policy implications of health plans and policies.

    This book will be essential reading for students and academics of health care policy, as well as for those involved in the policy process, whether as policy makers, researchers, managers of health care professionals.

  • Contemporary thinking about management is still frequently presented as a set of universal, eternal verities. In this fascinating book Roy Jacques presents a discursive history of industrial work relationships in the United States which powerfully demonstrates that they are not.

    A central concern is to show that current `common-sense' in management forms an historically and culturally specific way of thinking about work and society which is often inappropriate for `managing for the twenty-first century'. The author is equally interested in revealing the cultural basis for American management ideas, currently exported round the world as an objective science, disconnected from its cultural and historical roots.

    Roy Jacques considers: the Federalist world of the U S (c 1800-1870) and the traces of 19th century `pre-management' notions continuing in 20th century management and industrial discourse; the emergence and development of industrial organization and big business; the profound remapping of the boundaries of social life which occurred with the creation of jobs and wages; and the evolving construction of the employee as increasingly a disciplinary subject of psychological, personnel and general management knowledge. He also looks at several major current management and organizational topics such as: motivation, leadership and power in organizations; productivity and efficiency; work and the family; ideas about Total Quality Management, Business Process Re-engineering, `knowledge work' and so on.

  • `I love the warmth and wit in this book, but I say this in no way to detract from the seriousness of its subject matter and its incisive treatment by Mary Crawford... this is a great book and an important book which articulates current critical thinking about research around gender and language. Mary Crawford writes brilliantly, powerfully and lucidly... I thoroughly recommend it' - British Psychological Society Psychology of Women Section Newsletter

    This refreshing re-evaluation of current wisdom - both academic and popular - about men's and women's language critically assesses the abundant social science research of recent years and its representation in the mass media. Exploring a wide range of topics, from talk shows to self-help books, Mary Crawford offers a new understanding of the role of language practices in both maintaining - and disrupting - gender inequality.

    The book addresses such provocative questions as: Why has the study of gender and language so often focused on the limitations of women's talk? How do academic practices constrain our understanding of how gender relations are re-created and maintained in language use? Why do assertiveness texts usually ignore indirect modes of speech such as humour and storytelling?

  • This, the latest book from 'The School of Psychotherapy and Counselling Series' of Regent's College, is an intriguing book which explores complex areas and is recommended for the more experienced practitioner' - Counsellingbooks.com

    This book focuses in depth on how attention and the heart are involved in relating to others. The author draws in both west and west to illuminate this often neglected aspect of psychotherapeutic work. Sufic and Yogic approaches to heart consciousness are given as well as those from contemporary scientific studies which are discovering the heart's intelligence. Also drawing on contemporary contribution from cognitive psychology, neuroscience, Rosalind Pearmain describes the moment-by-moment process of relational contract in terms of an arc of attunement, amplification and reverberation and offers practical exercises to develop our heart's capacities to respond to others.

    `Intriguing.. extraordinary.. skillfull...' Counselling News

  • Drugs in Prison is an essential handbook for all those who work with prisoners as well as students of penal drugs policy. Comprehensive and easy to use, it: provides up-to-date information on drugs, drug misuse and drugs legislation; outlines government and prison strategies for tackling drug misuse; describes the various methods being used to combat drugs in prison; reviews the effectiveness of these approaches and the performance of different establishments; discusses future strategy and practice.

    Also featured are extensive index, a glossary, and useful appendices, case studies and checklists, which service to reinforce key learning points.

  • Transsexualism is a stimulating, proactive and important book. Colette Chiland does not back away from difficult issues. She forces all of us to look at our assumptions about t5ranssexualism and to re-examine what gender and sex really mean' - Christine Ware, author of Where Id Was: Challenging Normalization in Psychoanalysis

    'In a nutshell, the book offers a much-needed alternative view of transsexuality from a psychiatric and European point of view... Chiland's interesting and well presented book is a valued reminder of how different the same topic can appear in an alternative perspective' - Transgender Tapestry

    Colette Chiland exhibits a masterful and encyclopedic knowledge of transsexualism, drawing together the insights of depth psychology, psychoanalysis, history, anthropology and sociology for rethinking transsexualism in terms of identity, subjectivity and the wider socio-historical world. This book is written with considerable precision on complex, technical issues, whilst at the same time keeping the broader question of the relationship between transsexualism and society firmly in mind.

  • `There's no book like it. It's Saks' subject and he's good' - Roy Porter

    This fascinating book explores the changing relationship between orthodox and alternative medicine in Britain and the United States from the sixteenth century to the present day.

    Mike Saks sees the development of orthodox and alternative medicine as two sides of the same coin and his analysis centers on the role of professionalization in health care. In the sixteenth century, the line between orthodox and alternative medicine was blurred. By the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the increasing professionalization of orthodox bio-medicine had marginalized medical alternatives. In recent years, following the growth of a strong counter-culture in the 1960s and 1970s, perceptions of the relationship between the two forms of practice have begun to change again. The de-professionalization of orthodox medicine is being debated, while ironically, alternative medicine has become increasingly professionalized.


    Mike Saks considers the political dynamics of the process of professionalization, and looks at the dilemmas posed for both medical orthodoxy and alternative medicine in the development of a more integrated health care system in Britain and the United States in the future.

  • In this broad-ranging text, Peter Dahlgren clarifies the underlying theoretical concepts of civil society and the public sphere, and relates these to a critical analysis of the practice of television as journalism, as information and as entertainment. He demonstrates the limits and the possibilities of the television medium and the formats of popular journalism. These issues are linked to the potential of the audience to interpret or resist messages, and to construct its own meanings. What does a realistic understanding of the functioning and the capabilities of television imply for citizenship and democracy in a mediated age?

  • How can mainstream models and classifications be used in analyzing welfare states and gender? What sorts of modifications to traditional theory are required? These and other questions are addressed in this book - the first to synthesize the insights of feminist and mainstream research in examining the impact of gender on welfare state analysis and outcomes. The text also highlights the effect of welfare state policies on women and men.

    The international and interdisciplinary contributors approach the subject on two levels. First, they test the applicability of mainstream frameworks to new areas in analyzing gender. Second, they highlight possible reconceptualizations and innovative frameworks designed to provide gender-based analyses. These approaches are combined with a strong comparative component, focusing on a cross-section of countries of major interest in welfare state research.

  • Offering a major challenge to established textbooks and pointing to inspiring new ways of approaching sociology, this book presents a notable shift in introductory sociology. Too often the subject is taught as a dry and detached system of thought and practice. Passion is regarded as something to avoid or to treat with inherent suspicion. By asking questions about sociology and its relation to passion, the authors seek to revitalize the subject.

    The book introduces and develops a number of themes such as: identity, knowledge, magic, desire, power and everyday life. It argues that students should analyze these themes through practices including: reading, writing, speaking, storytelling and organizing. The authors aim to introduce students to sociology by a controlled engagement with practical sociological ideas and ways of seeing. In this way they hope that readers will participate in the creative possibilities of sociology.

  • `This book is a "must read" for all students of health psychology, and will be of considerable interest and value to others interested in the field. The discipline has not involved itself with the central issues of this book so far, but Radley has now brought this material together in an accessible way, offering important new perspectives, and directions for the discipline. This book goes a long way towards making sense for, and of, health psychology' - Journal of Health Psychology

    What are people's beliefs about health? What do they do when they feel ill? Why do they go to the doctor? How do they live with chronic disease? This introduction to the social psychology of health and illness addresses these and other questions about how people make sense of illness in everyday life, either alone or with the help of others.

    Alan Radley reviews findings from medical sociology, health psychology and medical anthropology to demonstrate the relevance of social and psychological explanations to questions about disease and its treatment. Topics covered include: illness, the patient and society; ideas about health and staying healthy; recognizing symptoms and falling ill; and the healing relationship: patients, nurses and doctors. The author also presents a critical account of related issues - stress, health promotion and gender differences.

  • `The author presents a plethora of infomation on users as individuals, their communities, research, healthcare markets and health service myths - old and new. It's a cool academic appraisal of where the power lies and how more might be shared with the patient' - Health Service Journal

    `Anything that helps us to understand the complexities of healthcare provision and what issues are important to users is therefore helpful. I welcome Christine Hogg's excellent summary of the issues raised by users about healthcare services. It clearly informs readers of the debates that need to take place and of the issues that healthcare practitioners should address in order to better serve their users.... So read the book to gain a better understanding of some of the issues that users feel strongly about' - British Medical Journal

    Making an original contribution to debates on health policy, this accessible and engaging book critically examines the future of health care and public health policy from the perspective of users and citizens. Consumerism, partnerships with patients and user involvement are seen as key to future health care and healthy public policies.

    The book outlines how individuals as patients, healthy people and research subjects relate to health services and how the public, as citizens, influence health care and public policies at local, national and international levels.

  • This innovative volume explores ways in which the idea of citizenship can be seen as a unifying concept in understanding contemporary social change and social problems.

    The book outlines traditional linkages between citizenship and public participation, national identity and social welfare, and shows the relevance of citizenship for a range of rising issues extending from global change through gender to the environment. The areas investigated include: the challenge of internationalization to the nation state and to national identities; the contested nature of citizenship in relation to poverty, work and welfare; the implications of gender inequality; and the potential for new conceptions of citizenship in response to cultural and political change.

  • `Useful for the insights about introducing a new service into the general practice environment' - Family Practice

    Counselling practitioners in primary care settings have unique circumstances to contend with. This book offers practical guidance for managing the issues these counsellors face, exploring the complex dynamics of health care teams and providing a guide to the safe and effective practice of counselling in primary health care contexts.

    The book highlights potential sources of difficulty for this group, from needing to maximize therapeutic contact while using time-limited techniques, to working with a wide range of patients and problems and relying increasingly on evidence-based practice.

  • Information and communication technologies are said to be transforming urban life dramatically and bringing about rapid economic and cultural globalization. This book explores the many fascinating and urgent issues involved by relating advanced theoretical debates to practical matters of communication with cultural policy. It maps out a range of `optimistic' and `pessimistic' scenarios with special regard to various forms of inequality, particularly class, gender and geopolitical. Topics discussed include urban planning, virtual cities and actual cities, economic and political policy, and critical social analysis of current trends that are of momentous consequence. The book concludes that it is necessary to bring together a number of differently informing approaches, cultural, economic, political and technological, to make sense of a field of dynamic and contradictory forces.

  • `This book explores what clients have to say about their experience of the psychotherapeutic process. David Howe observes that, regardless of the therapist's theoretical orientation, clients say similar things about their experience of being helped (and not being helped). It is the non-specifics of genuineness, a secure trusting atmosphere, empathy and warmth that offer the vehicle for encouraging a dialogue of personal intimate material, and of "making sense" and understanding when we are in pain, puzzled or worried.... This is an easy and gentle read.... For those interested in Attachment Theory, this would be a useful addition to their bookshelf' - Clinical Psychology Forum

    There is a growing interest in what clients have to say about their experiences of counselling and psychotherapy. In a powerful analysis of this subject, David Howe identifies a number of clear and potent messages. He explores such questions as why clients say the things they say and why the therapeutic alliance holds out such promise, and, using the client's experience as a platform, seeks to create a general theory of counselling and psychotherapy.

    The author draws on a number of new and exciting ideas emerging in developmental psychology, sociology and the brain sciences to discuss the process by which the human infant becomes an individual as well as a competent social being. From the basis that the social and psychological structures which generate the client's experience underlie all psychotherapeutic encounters, the book then explores how the self forms and then re-forms in social relationships, including those established during counselling and psychotherapy. In conclusion, the reader is invited to consider a number of thought-provoking claims about the universal qualities that characterize good and bad practice in all schools of counselling, therapy and the helping process.

  • Seminars by Professor Windy Dryden. See the man live and in action. To find out more and to book your place go to www.cityminds.com

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    SAGE celebrated the 20th Anniversary of the Counselling in Action in November 2008. To view the video - click here

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    `How hard it is to find a book to recommend to trainees, which will give them an insight into what counselling (and psychotherapy too, for that matter) is really like. This book does exactly that.... This is a book which would be equally useful to the humanistic practitioner and the more orthodox one. The breadth of sympathy is admirable in dealing with what is common to all orientations. This is one of those rare books which does justice both to the human experiences involved in counselling and psychotherapy, and to the theory which might explain those experiences' - Changes



    What is the experience of counselling from the perspectives of both client and counsellor? What can be learned for the practice of counselling from an understanding of how it feels to be a client or a counsellor? Addressing these questions, central to this book are the personal accounts of individual clients and counsellors, who each relate their own very different experiences of counselling. They explore such issues as identity, expectations, trust, power and boundaries in the client-counsellor relationship. And each examines the intense personal meanings of `success' or `failure' in the client or counsellor role. An analysis of the implications for the counselling relationship concludes the volume.

  • `A well-researched, clearly written book... Petruska Clarkson and JenniferMackewn did a splendid job organizing the theoretical material... Their judicious use of graphics enhances their discussions... The chapter on Perls' contributions to practice is nicely peppered by samples of his actual therapy work and this is true for other chapters. This, I imagine, is how Fritz would have liked it: to let his work speak for itself... Petruska Clarkson and Jennifer Mackewn have carefully crafted and produced a powerfully informative book. Its pages are crammed with up-to-date facts and issues relating to Perls... The work is lean, not one word is wasted. Congratulations!' - British Gestalt Journal

    Fritz Perls was the co-founder of Gestalt Therapy, which is based on a holistic view of people and their relationship to the environment, and which remains one of the most influential approaches in counselling and psychotherapy today. This book provides a clear account of the diverse life of this popular but controversial psychotherapist and discusses his ideas simply and lucidly.

    The book includes examples of Perls' work, drawn from transcripts and films of his demonstration sessions. A further feature is a full acknowledgement of the criticisms and appreciations which Perls' life and work have attracted and an honest evaluation of whether and to what extent they are justified.

  • This illuminating and incisive textbook traces the development of work psychology and organizational behaviour from the early twentieth century to the present day. Far from being a conventional history of ideas, it is a demonstration of how each emerging school of thought has reflected the search for solutions to particular management problems, within specific social, political and economic contexts. Its primary focus is the relations among knowledge, power and practice.

    Hollway deftly documents the key developments in the field, from scientific management and industrial psychology, through the human relations movement, to such current concerns as organizational culture, leadership and human resources management. She examines their production within particular conditions and power structures. She charts the impact of each trend upon the emergence of new management tools, work practices and ways in which employee regulation is attempted. The book concludes with a projection of the likely future development of work psychology and organizational behaviour in the light of current changes in work and employer-employee relations.

    Work Psychology and Organizational Behaviour will be essential reading for teachers, students and practitioners in occupational psychology, organizational behaviour, industrial and organizational sociology, personnel and human resources management and public administration.

  • `This book represents a significant intervention and, as such, should be used on numerous cultural studies courses. In its intellectual honesty and clarity Tudor's book will stand as an authoritative basis for further developments in the coming years' - David Chaney

    Decoding Culture offers a concise and accessible account of the development of cultural studies from the late 1950s to the 1990s. Focusing on the significant theoretical and methodological assumptions that have informed the cultural studies project - the text: covers the key thinkers and key perspectives including, structuralism and post-structuralism, Screen theory, the Birmingham School, and audience analysis; offers a timely corrective to anti-sociological interpretations of cultural change; and invites readers to contest the standard 'text-book' accounts of the developement of cultural studies.

    Through its fair and accessible account of complex ideas, Decoding Culture provides a more analytic understading of the theoretical and methodological dynamics of cultural studies than has been hitherto available. It will be welcomed by all students of cultural studies, sociology and media studies.

  • The realms of consumption have typically been seen to be distinct from those of work and production. This book examines how contemporary rhetorics and discourses of organizational change are breaking down such distinctions - with significant implications for the construction of subjectivities and identities at work.

    In particular, Paul du Gay shows how the capacities and predispositions required of consumers and those required of employees are increasingly difficult to distinguish. Both consumers and employees are represented as autonomous, responsible, calculating individuals. They are constituted as such in the language of consumer cultures and the all-pervasive discourses of enterprise whereby persons are required to be entrepreneurs of the self, at work, at play and in all aspects of their lives.
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    The first part of the book explores certain limitations in traditional approaches to the analysis of work identity. It presents an alternative, discursive framework in which to address contemporary `re-imaginings' of organizational life within the `cult(ure)' of the consumer. Part Two develops the analysis by looking at an arena where the blurring of the boundaries between work and consumption identities is most pronounced - retailing. The author builds a sophisticated picture of how discourses of reform take hold in particular contexts, how they construct particular subject positions for employees to occupy, and how employees negotiate these identities in their everyday working lives. He concludes by considering the ethical and other issues of `setting limits to enterprise'.

  • Over the past decade, many companies have adopted new strategies for manufacturing, which have taken their competitiveness on to new planes. A whole array of initiatives, such as FMS, JIT, TQM, CIM, and MRP II, have been introduced. This book deals with the far-reaching significance of these new approaches - collectively labelled "new wave manufacturing".

    Considerable research evidence as well as practitioners' own experiences make one crucial point time and time again. The organizational as well as the human resource management aspects of these new strategies are critical to their success or failure. The underlying theme which is tackled in this book, therefore, is to what extent do these new operational strategies require a matching set of organizational and HR strategies?

    By looking at the issues through the joint eyes of production and behavioural analysts, this book provides an unique introduction to the new developments in manufacturing as well as providing an up-to-date assessment of the organizational and H R dimensions to these methods.

    New Wave Manufacturing Strategies has a vision which goes beyond the "new technology"/advanced manufacturing technology discussions.

    The chapters have been written in a clear, accessible manner by leading experts from Europe, the USA and Australia as well as from the UK.

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