Littérature générale

  • Set mostly in Manhattan—although also featuring Atlantic City, Brooklyn, GMail Chat, and Gainsville, Florida—this autobiographical novella, spanning two years in the life of a young writer with a cultish following, has been described by the author as “A shoplifting book about vague relationships,” “2 parts shoplifting arrest, 5 parts vague relationship issues,” and “An ultimately lifeaffirming book about how the unidirectional nature of time renders everything beautiful and sad.”   From VIP rooms in hip New York City clubs to central booking in Chinatown, from New York University’s Bobst Library to a bus in someone’s backyard in a collegetown in Florida, from Bret Easton Ellis to Lorrie Moore, and from Moby to Ghost Mice, it explores class, culture, and the arts in all their American forms through the funny, journalistic, and existentiallyminded narrative of someone trying to both “not be a bad person” and “find some kind of happiness or something,” while he is driven by his failures and successes at managing his art, morals, finances, relationships, loneliness, confusion, boredom, future, and depression.

  • As the First World War reaches its final year, an illicit love affair is beginning between a sixteen-year-old boy and a young woman married to a soldier at the front. They meet secretly in her flat on the outskirts of Paris, in cornfields and on river banks. When she receives letters from her husband, they burn them together. Intoxicated by passion, they cannot bear to end their affair, even when it causes a scandal among their friends and neighbours. Instead, they can only hurtle towards tragedy.


    Written in spare, haunting prose when Raymond Radiguet was still a teenager, this semi-autobiographical novel became an instant bestseller and its author was hailed as a genius, before dying tragically at the age of twenty. Expressing all the anguish and joy of adolescence, it is a work of startling imagery and subtle beauty.

  • Restored to print for the first time in more than forty years, The President was hailed by the New York Times as a tour de force At 82, the former premier lives in alert and suspicious retirement--self exile--on the Normandy coast, writing his anxiously anticipated memoirs and receiving visits from statesman and biographers. In his library is the self-condemning, handwritten confession of the premiers former attaché, Chalamont, hidden between the pages of a sumptuously produced work of privately printed pornography--a confession that the premier himself had dictated and forced Chalamont to sign. Now the long-thwarted Chalamont has been summoned to form a new coalition in the wake of the governments collapse. The premier alone possesses the secret of Chalamonts guilt, of his true character--and has publicly vowed: Hell never be Premier as long as Im alive... Nor when Im dead, either. Inspired by French Premier Georges Clemenceau, The President is a masterpiece of psychological suspense and a probing account of the decline of power.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • "All crowds have to howl."Although F.Scott Fitzgerald is known for the kind of subtle, polished social commentary found in his masterpiece The Great Gatsby, his little-known novella May Day is unique in that it is the most raw, directly political commentary he ever wrote, and one of the most desperate works in his oeuvre.
    It is a tale of the brutalities of the American class system-of privileged college boys, returned from a bloody war, and a group of intellectual left-wing journalists, all coming into confrontation in the heart of New York City on Mayday at the end of World War I. Fitzgerald's fine eye for detail is on special display and his relentless plot leads to one of his most shocking climaxes, in what is the first and only stand alone version of this rarity.
    The Art of The Novella Series Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • One single noise reached her ears now, the voice of the parrot.With an attention to the details of bourgeois life considered almost scandalous at the time,yes'>#160;A Simple Heartyes'>#160;will remind many why Gustave Flaubert was acclaimed as the first great master of realism. But this heartbreaking tale of a simple servant woman and her lifelong search for love meant something else to Flaubert. Written near the end of his life, the work was meant to be a tribute to George Sandyes'>mdash;who died before it was finishedyes'>mdash;and was written in answer to an argument the two were having over the importance of realism. Although the tale displays his virtuosic gift for telling detail, and is based on one of his actual servants, Flaubert said it exemplified his belief that "Beauty is the object of all my efforts." This sparkling new translation by Charlotte Mandell shows how impeccably Flaubert achieved his goal.The Art of The Novella Series Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.

  • En 1799, au large des côtes du Chili, un bateau américain conduit par le capitaine Delano croise un bateau espagnol en piteux état, le San Dominick. Delano embarque à son bord pour proposer son aide. La plupart des officiers du bateau espagnol a disparu. Des esclaves noirs sont installés partout sur le bateau. Benito Cereno, le capitaine du navire négrier, raconte que le bateau a essuyé une tempête, puis que le scorbut a frappé l'équipage. Mais de nombreux détails interpellent Delano, il doute que ce soit la véritable histoire du San Dominick et de son équipage. Benito Cereno est un récit admirablement mené et profondément angoissant. Ses pages offrent une perfection dans la technique, une intensité d'atmosphère et une qualité de suspense qui font de Melville l'égal d'un Joseph Conrad.Édition Ebooks libres et gratuits.

  • When the night came, he went to the meeting-place, and quietly let himself be blindfolded.
    Raw as Honoré de Balzac is famed to be, this daring novella--never before published as a stand-alone book--is perhaps the most outlandish thing he ever wrote. While still concerned with the depiction of the underside of Parisian life, as is most of Balzacs oeuvre, The Girl with the Golden Eyes considers not the working lives of the poor, but the sex lives of the upper crust.
    In a nearly boroque rendering with erotically charged details as well as lush and extravagant language, The Girl with the Golden Eyes tells the story of a rich and ruthless young man in nineteenth century Paris caught up in an amorous entanglement with a mysterious beauty. His control slipping, incest, homosexuality, sexual slavery, and violence combine in what was then, and still remains, a shocking and taboo-breaking work.
    The Art of The Novella Series Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Anglais Fanfarlo

    Charles Baudelaire

    A stunning new translation of a neglected masterpiece by one of historys most celebrated writers.
    Ten years before Baudelaire published his masterpiece, The Flowers of Evil, the great poet penned the only prose fiction of his career: La Fanfarlo. The novella describes the torrid real-life affair the poet had with Jean Duval, a dancer whose beauty and sexuality Baudelaire came to obsess over. The outcome is a work of raw emotional power and a clear distillation of the Parisians poetic genius. As Baudelaire himself said, Always be a poet, even in prose.
    *** This is a Hybrid Book.
    Melville House HybridBooks combine print and digital media into an enhanced reading experience by including with each title additional curated material called Illuminations -- maps, photographs, illustrations, and further writing about the author and the book.
    The Melville House Illuminations are free with the purchase of any title in the HybridBook series, no matter the format.
    Purchasers of the print version can obtain the Illuminations for a given title simply by scanning the QR code found in the back of each book, or by following the url also given in the back of the print book, then downloading the Illumination in whatever format works best for you.
    Purchasers of the digital version receive the appropriate Illuminations automatically as part of the ebook edition.

  • The greater the windbag the greater the calamity.Henry James examines one of his favorite topics--the artists place in society--by profiling a genius who just cant seem to support himself. A dazzling intellectual and brilliant speaker, Mr. Saltram has become the most sought-after houseguest in England. But, as his intellectual labors slacken, it beomes harder and harder to get him to leave.A wry, edgy comedy about the fine line between making art...and freeloading. The Coxon Fund shows off a gift that is rarely appreciated about Henry James: he can be wickedly funny.The Art of The Novella Series Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.

  • "You know as well as you sit there that you'd put a pistol-ball into your brain if you had written my books!" Exemplifying Henry James's famous belief that "Art makes life," The Lesson of the Master is a piercing study of the life that art makes. When the tale's protagonist--a gifted young writer--meets and befriends a famous author he has long idolized, he is both repelled by and attracted to the artist's great secret: the emotional costs of a life dedicated to art.
    With extraordinary psychological insight and devastating wit, the novella asks the question of whether art is, ultimately, demeaning or ennobling for the artist, while capturing the ambiguities of a life devoted to art, and the choices artists must make. The expatriate James knew these choice well by the time he published the novella in the Universal Review in 1888, and the work reveals him at the height of his powers.
    The Art of The Novella Series Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.

  • "Ever since I could chase a bone, I've longed to talk...." The first talking-dog story in Western literature--from the writer generally acknowledged, alongside William Shakespeare, as the founding father of modern literature, no less?
    Indeed, The Dialogue of the Dogs features, in a condensed, powerful version, all the traits the author of Don Quixote is famous for: It's a picaresque rich in bawdy humor, social satire, and fantasy, and it uses story tactics that were innovative at the time, such as the philandering husband who, given syphilis by his wife, is hospitalized. Late one feverish night he overhears the hospital's guard dogs telling each other their life's story--a wickedly ironic tale within the tale within the tale, wherein the two virtuous canines find themselves victim, time and again, to deceitful, corrupt humanity.
    Here in a sparkling new translation, the parody of a Greek dialogue is so entertaining it belies the stunningly prescient sophistication of this novella--that it is a story about telling stories, and about creating a new way to discuss morality that isn't rooted in empiricism. In short, it's a masterful work that flies in the face of the forms and ethics of its time...and perhaps ours as well.
    The Art of The Novella Series Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form bloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.

  • Sir Henry Maximilian Max Beerbohm was, like his friend Oscar Wilde, such an acclaimed wit (and essayist, caricaturist, and parodist) that George Bernard Shaw dubbed him the incomparable Max. But Beerbohms comic masterpiece Zuleika Dobson--one of the Modern Librarys top 100 English-language novels of the twentieth century--is the only novel he ever wrote.
    Strangely out of print in the United States for years, this crackling farce is nonetheless as piercing and fresh as when it first appeared in 1911: a hilarious dismantling of academia and privilege, and a swashbuckling lampooning of class systems and notions of masculine virtue.
    The all-male campus of Oxford--Beerbohms alma mater--is a place where aesthetics holds sway above all else, and where witty intellectuals reign. Things havent changed for its privileged student body for years ... until the beguiling music-hall prestidigitator Zuleika Dobson shows up.
    The books marvelous prose dances along the line between reality and the absurd as students and dons alike fall at Zuleikas feet, and she cuts a wide swath across the campus--until she encounters one young aristocrat for whom she is astonished to find she has feelings.
    As Zuleika, and her creator, zero in on their targets, the book takes some surprising and dark twists on its way to a truly startling ending--an ending so striking that readers will understand why Virginia Woolf said that Mr. Beerbohm in his way is perfect.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • "My gord, Carnehan," says Daniel, "This is a tremenjus business, and we've got the whole country as far as it's worth having."Literature’s most famous adventure story, this stirring tale of two happygolucky British ne’redowells trying to carve out their own kingdom in the remote mountains of Afghanistan has also proved over time to be a work of penetrating and lasting political insightyes'>mdash;amidst its raucous humor and swashbuckling bravado is a devastatingly astute dissection of imperialism and its heroic pretensions. Written when he was only 22 years old, the tale also features some of Rudyard Kipling’s most crystalline prose, and one of the most beautifully rendered, spectacularly exotic settings he ever used. Best of all, it features two of his most unforgettable characters, the ultravivid Cockneys Peachy Carnahan and Daniel Dravot, who impart to the story its ultimate, astonishing twist: it is both a tragedy and a triumph.The Art of The Novella Series Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Although this novella stands out from his body of work in that its a playful yet sinister fairy tale, it brilliantly fuses F. Scott Fitzgeralds ongoing lush fantasies about the extremes of wealth with his much more somber understanding of what underpins it. Loosely inspired by a summer he spent as a teenager working on a ranch in Montana, The Diamond as Big as the Ritz is Fitzgeralds hallucinatory paean to the American West and all its promises.
    Its the story of John T. Unger, a young Southerner who goes to Montana for summer vacation with a wealthy college classmate. But the classmates family proves to be much more than simply wealthy: They own a mountain made entirely of one solid diamond. And theyve gone to dreadful lengths to conceal their secret meaning John could be in danger.
    But the family also has a daughter, lovely Kismine, and with her help, John may yet escape the fate her family has meted out to all their other guests so far

  • It's unclear why even many Henry James fans aren't familiar with this wicked early work, as it's James at his scathing best --- piercing, elegant, and ahead of his time.
    The story of an American hack journalist in Europe, The Reverberator is an early example of James' fascination with Americans confronting Europe's version of civilized society. Yet here he gives the theme a sly twist, as the Europeans find themselves enamored with a particularly uncivil brand of Americanism ...
    George Flack, a rising star in the scandal-mongering new American journalism of the 1880s, finds himself posted to Paris as a foreign correspondent for The Reverberator. And, like half of Paris, he finds himself in love with the beautiful but naïve --- and engaged --- American girl Francie Dosson. But when Francie innocently reveals something about her fiancé's snobby family to Flack, Francie, her fiancé, and all of Paris suddenly find themselves in a public scandal of a type not seen before in the world's most sophisticated city.
    Informed, no doubt, by James own, miserable experience as a Paris-based correspondent for the New York Tribune, The Reverberator features his normal lucid and penetrating prose, although less complicated than his later prose --- and with a bit of extra zing his fans may not expect.
    Ebook ISBN: 978-1-61219-157-7

  • “Ben Jelloun is arguably Morocco’s greatest living author, whose impressive body of work combines intellect and imagination in magical fusion.” --The Guardian In The Happy Marriage, the internationally acclaimed Moroccan author Tahar Ben Jelloun tells the story of one couple--first from the husband’s point of view, then from the wife’s--just as legal reforms are about to change women’s rights forever. The husband, a painter in Casablanca, has been paralyzed by a stroke at the very height of his career and becomes convinced that his marriage is the sole reason for his decline. Walled up within his illness and desperate to break free of a deeply destructive relationship, he finds escape in writing a secret book about his hellish marriage. When his wife finds it, she responds point by point with her own version of the facts, offering her own striking and incisive reinterpretation of their story. Who is right and who is wrong? A thorny issue in a society where marriage remains a sacrosanct institution, but where there’s also a growing awareness of women’s rights. And in their absorbing struggle, both sides of this modern marriage find out they may not be so enlightened after all. From the Hardcover edition.

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