John Muir

  • Mégafeux, tempêtes ultrapuissantes, orages et déluges, grandes avalanches ou tremblements de terre : la nature a ses colères et John Muir les a toujours goûtées, observées, presque recherchées. Grand marcheur et magnifique écrivain, ce pionnier de l'écologie fut, au tournant du XXe siècle, leur interprète le plus fin. Son empathie était totale : il était le feu, l'arbre, il était la bourrasque et la neige, il était l'éclair. Les récits et descriptions réunis dans ce livre, d'une sensualité surprenante et d'un savoir sans faille, témoignent tous de sa curiosité aventureuse et de son absolu amour de la nature. "Il est plus extraordinaire que Thoreau", disait de lui Ralph Waldo Emerson.

  • "My First Summer in the Sierra" (1911) takes inspiration from Muir's journals of the months he spent between June and September 1869 as a shepherd in the Sierras. Muir went on to built a cabin along Yosemite Creek, where he lived for two years. He designed it in such a way that a portion of the stream flowed through it, as he wanted to enjoy its music. From French Bar to Mono Lake and the Yosemite Valley, he was awestruck by everything he saw. The antics of the smallest "insect people" amazed him as much as stunted thousand-year old Juniper trees growing with inconceivable tenacity from tiny cracks in the stone. In this novel, he tells of the nature in the Sierra, and of his ascension of Mt. Hoffman and other local peaks.



    John Muir (1838-1914) was a Scottish-American author and naturalist, who is traditionally considered to be the "Father of the National Parks". Born in Dunbar (East Lothian), he spent his childhood exploring the area, and that is where his love of nature first bloomed. In 1849, his family emigrated to Portage, Wisconsin for religious reasons. At 22, he joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison, from which he never graduated, as he preferred to take a multitude of different classes in the variety of subjects he was interested him, such as chemistry, botany and geology. In 1866, whilst working at an Indianapolis wagon wheel factory, he got into a serious accident and almost lost his sight. When he recovered, he decided to follow his dreams and explore nature. In September 1867, he walked from Kentucky to Florida, later describing the trip in his "A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf." In 1868, he boarded a ship to Cuba, then later on sailed to New York City, from whence he travelled to California. From there, he decided to visit Yosemite, which he had long read about. He was one of the first to infer that the landscape there must have been formed by glaciers, a widely disputed theory at the time. Muir wrote countless essays, books and letters recounting his adventures out in nature, especially in the Sierra Nevada, which have been read by millions. He played a vital role in the preservation of natural areas, and the creations of Yosemite and Sequoia National Park, amongst many others.

  • When John Muir traveled to California in 1868, he found the pristine mountain ranges that would inspire his life’s work. The Mountains of California is the culmination of the ten years Muir spent in the Sierra Nevadas, studying every crag, crook, and valley with great care and contemplation.Bill McKibben writes in his Introduction that Muir "invents, by sheer force of his love, an entirely new vocabulary and grammar of the wild . . . a language of ecstasy and exuberance." The Mountains of California is as vibrant and vital today as when it was written over a century ago. This Modern Library Paperback Classic includes the photographs and line drawings from the original 1898 edition.From the Trade Paperback edition.
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  • No other writer is so ceaselessly astonished by the natural world as he.' Robert Macfarlane The name of John Muir has come to stand for the protection of wild land and wilderness in both America and Britain. Born in Dunbar in 1838, Muir is famed as a pioneer of conservation, and his passion, discipline and vision are still inspirational today.

    Combining acute observation with a sense of inner discovery, Muir's description of the summer he spent in what would become Yosemite National park in California's Sierra Nevada mountains raises an awareness of nature to a spiritual dimension. His journal provides a unique weaving of natural history, lyrical prose and amusing anecdote, retaining a freshness, intensity and honesty which will amaze the modern reader.

    'The richness of Muir's writing roots deeper into the terrain than any other wilderness writer known to me.' Los Angeles Times 'As more and more of us grow aghast at what we have done to the world we started with, Muir's reverence and devotion will seem keenly germane, and our regret may be transmuted into a fight for the future.' Edward Hoagland

  • 'No other writer is so ceaselessly astonished by the natural world as he.' Robert Macfarlane The name of John Muir has come to stand for the protection of wild land and wilderness in both America and Britain. Born in Dunbar in 1838, Muir is famed as a pioneer of conservation, and his passion, discipline and vision are still inspirational today.

    Combining acute observation with a sense of inner discovery, Muir's description of the summer he spent in what would become Yosemite National park in California's Sierra Nevada mountains raises an awareness of nature to a spiritual dimension. His journal provides a unique weaving of natural history, lyrical prose and amusing anecdote, retaining a freshness, intensity and honesty which will amaze the modern reader.

    'The richness of Muir's writing roots deeper into the terrain than any other wilderness writer known to me.' Los Angeles Times 'As more and more of us grow aghast at what we have done to the world we started with, Muir's reverence and devotion will seem keenly germane, and our regret may be transmuted into a fight for the future.' Edward Hoagland

  • Introduced by Graham White.

    'When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.' John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra The name of John Muir has come to stand for the protection of wild land and wilderness in both America and Britain. Born in Dunbar in 1838, Muir is famed as the father of American conservation. This collection, including the rarely seen Stickeen, presents the finest of Muir's writings, and imparts a rounded portrait of a man whose generosity, passion, discipline and vision are an inspiration to this day.

    Combining acute observation with a sense of inner discovery, Muir's writings of his travels though some of the greatest landscapes on Earth, including the Carolinas, Florida, Alaska and those lands which were to become the great National Parks of Yosemite and the Sierra Valley, raise an awareness of nature to a spiritual dimension. These journals provide a unique marriage of natural history with lyrical prose and often amusing anecdotes, retaining a freshness, intensity and brutal honesty which will amaze the modern reader.

  • Introduced by Frank Tindall.

    Unknown in his native Scotland, John Muir is renowned in America as the father of conservation. A friend of presidents and founder of National Parks, Muir was inspired by a love and a vision of nature as remarkable today as it was last century.

    Born in mid-19th-century Scotland, Muir was eleven when his fanatically religious father took the family to build a new life in America's vast wilderness. He recalls his childhood and youth with startling clarity, depicting a wild boy whose quiet individuality and determination are already emerging. The pioneering years in Wisconsin powerfully anticipate the extraordinary career which was to follow. They reveal a free spirit who perceived bonds between man and nature that were subtle and far reaching for both.

  • In the late 1800s, John Muir made several trips to the pristine, relatively unexplored territory of Alaska, irresistibly drawn to its awe-inspiring glaciers and its wild menagerie of bears, bald eagles, wolves, and whales. Half-poet and half-geologist, he recorded his experiences and reflections in Travels in Alaska, a work he was in the process of completing at the time of his death in 1914. As Edward Hoagland writes in his Introduction, "A century and a quarter later, we are reading [Muir's] account because there in the glorious fiords . . . he is at our elbow, nudging us along, prompting us to understand that heaven is on earth--is the Earth--and rapture is the sensible response wherever a clear line of sight remains." This Modern Library Paperback Classic includes photographs from the original 1915 edition.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • In the spring of 1869, John Muir was looking for means of support to fund his explorations of California’s Central Valley region. A ranch owner offered him a job herding sheep in the Sierra Nevada. As he explored the region, he jotted down his keen observations of the scenic countryside, and he eventually became a guide for some of Yosemite’s most famous visitors, including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Muir documented these experiences in The Yosemite, first published in 1912. It is at once a vivid, accurate description of the land and a passionate homage to nature.This Modern Library Paperback Classic is a facsimile of the 1912 edition and includes the original illustrations.From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • In the late 1800s, John Muir made several trips to the pristine, relatively unexplored territory of Alaska, irresistibly drawn to its awe-inspiring glaciers and its wild menagerie of bears, bald eagles, wolves, and whales. Half-poet and half-geologist, he recorded his experiences and reflections in Travels in Alaska, a work he was in the process of completing at the time of his death in 1914. As Edward Hoagland writes in his Introduction, "A century and a quarter later, we are reading [Muir's] account because there in the glorious fiords . . . he is at our elbow, nudging us along, prompting us to understand that heaven is on earth--is the Earth--and rapture is the sensible response wherever a clear line of sight remains." This Modern Library Paperback Classic includes photographs from the original 1915 edition.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Here is the adventure that started John Muir on a lifetime of discovery. Taken from his earliest journals, this book records Muir's walk in 1867 from Indiana across Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida to the Gulf Coast. In his distinct and wonderful style, Muir shows us the wilderness, as well as the towns and people, of the South immediately after the Civil War.

  • In early March 1867, Muir was injured while working at a wagon wheels factory: a tool he was using slipped and struck him in the eye. This accident changed the course of his life. He was confined to a darkened room for six weeks, worried he'd lost his sight forever. When he did recover, the world looked completely different and life had taken on a new meaning for him. Muir later said, "This affliction has driven me to the sweet fields. God has to nearly kill us sometimes, to teach us lessons." From that point on, he determined to "be true to myself" and follow his dream of exploring and studying plants.

    A Thousand Mile Walk to the Gulf recounts Muir's walk of approximately 1,000 miles (1,600 km) from Indiana to Florida. He did not follow a specific route, only going by the "wildest, leafiest, and least trodden way I could find." This journal is the earliest of Muir's writings and autobiographically bridges the period between "The Story of my Boyhood and Youth" and "My First Summer in the Sierra."



    John Muir (1838-1914) was a Scottish-American author and naturalist, who is traditionally considered to be the "Father of the National Parks". Born in Dunbar (East Lothian), he spent his childhood exploring the area, and that is where his love of nature first bloomed. In 1849, his family emigrated to Portage, Wisconsin for religious reasons. At 22, he joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison, from which he never graduated, as he preferred to take a multitude of different classes in the variety of subjects he was interested him, such as chemistry, botany and geology. In 1866, whilst working at an Indianapolis wagon wheel factory, he got into a serious accident and almost lost his sight. When he recovered, he decided to follow his dreams and explore nature. In September 1867, he walked from Kentucky to Florida, later describing the trip in his "A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf." In 1868, he boarded a ship to Cuba, then later on sailed to New York City, from whence he travelled to California. From there, he decided to visit Yosemite, which he had long read about. He was one of the first to infer that the landscape there must have been formed by glaciers, a widely disputed theory at the time. Muir wrote countless essays, books and letters recounting his adventures out in nature, especially in the Sierra Nevada, which have been read by millions. He played a vital role in the preservation of natural areas, and the creations of Yosemite and Sequoia National Park, amongst many others.

  • Ce texte vibrant est un chant à la gloire de la wilderness, cette nature pas encore totalement dénaturée par les activités humaines. Les forêts profondes aux essences variées, les lacs miroitants, les ruisseaux murmurants et les cascades toniques, les montagnes imposantes participent, avec grâce et mystère, aux paysages américains traversés trop vite par une humanité plus préoccupée par ce que l'économie pourrait en retirer que par la beauté encore sauvage, inutile et gratuite, qu'ils offrent. John Muir, qui connait parfaitement ces lieux de solitude, nous les décrit avec précision et amour, inquiet de leur devenir, alors que retentissent les coups des haches des bûcherons...Comment les protéger d'interventions fatales ? En les sanctuarisant comme parcs naturels nationaux, ouverts néanmoins au tourisme ? Un article inédit en français de John Muir, présenté et commenté par Thierry Paquot

  • Introduced by Frank Tindall.

    Unknown in his native Scotland, John Muir is renowned in America as the father of conservation. A friend of presidents and founder of National Parks, Muir was inspired by a love and a vision of nature as remarkable today as it was last century.

    Born in mid-19th-century Scotland, Muir was eleven when his fanatically religious father took the family to build a new life in America's vast wilderness. He recalls his childhood and youth with startling clarity, depicting a wild boy whose quiet individuality and determination are already emerging. The pioneering years in Wisconsin powerfully anticipate the extraordinary career which was to follow. They reveal a free spirit who perceived bonds between man and nature that were subtle and far reaching for both.

  • When John Muir traveled to California in 1868, he found the pristine mountain ranges that would inspire his life's work. The Mountains of California is the culmination of the ten years Muir spent in the Sierra Nevadas, studying every crag, crook, and valley with great care and contemplation.
    Bill McKibben writes in his Introduction that Muir "invents, by sheer force of his love, an entirely new vocabulary and grammar of the wild . . . a language of ecstasy and exuberance." The Mountains of California is as vibrant and vital today as when it was written over a century ago.
    This Modern Library Paperback Classic includes the photographs and line drawings from the original 1898 edition.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • No other writer is so ceaselessly astonished by the natural world as he.' Robert Macfarlane The name of John Muir has come to stand for the protection of wild land and wilderness in both America and Britain. Born in Dunbar in 1838, Muir is famed as a pioneer of conservation, and his passion, discipline and vision are still inspirational today.

    Combining acute observation with a sense of inner discovery, Muir's description of the summer he spent in what would become Yosemite National park in California's Sierra Nevada mountains raises an awareness of nature to a spiritual dimension. His journal provides a unique weaving of natural history, lyrical prose and amusing anecdote, retaining a freshness, intensity and honesty which will amaze the modern reader.

    'The richness of Muir's writing roots deeper into the terrain than any other wilderness writer known to me.' Los Angeles Times 'As more and more of us grow aghast at what we have done to the world we started with, Muir's reverence and devotion will seem keenly germane, and our regret may be transmuted into a fight for the future.' Edward Hoagland

  • No other writer is so ceaselessly astonished by the natural world as he.' Robert Macfarlane The name of John Muir has come to stand for the protection of wild land and wilderness in both America and Britain. Born in Dunbar in 1838, Muir is famed as a pioneer of conservation, and his passion, discipline and vision are still inspirational today.

    Combining acute observation with a sense of inner discovery, Muir's description of the summer he spent in what would become Yosemite National park in California's Sierra Nevada mountains raises an awareness of nature to a spiritual dimension. His journal provides a unique weaving of natural history, lyrical prose and amusing anecdote, retaining a freshness, intensity and honesty which will amaze the modern reader.

    'The richness of Muir's writing roots deeper into the terrain than any other wilderness writer known to me.' Los Angeles Times 'As more and more of us grow aghast at what we have done to the world we started with, Muir's reverence and devotion will seem keenly germane, and our regret may be transmuted into a fight for the future.' Edward Hoagland

  • In a lifetime of exploration, writing, and passionate political activism, John Muir became America's most eloquent spokesman for the mystery and majesty of the wilderness. A crucial figure in the creation of our national parks system and a far-seeing prophet of environmental awareness who founded the Sierra Club in 1892, he was also a master of natural description who evoked with unique power and intimacy the untrammeled landscapes of the American West. The Library of America's Nature Writings collects his most significant and best-loved works in a single volume, including: The Story of My Boyhood and Youth (1913), My First Summer in the Sierra (1911), The Mountains of California (1894) and Stickeen (1909). Rounding out the volume is a rich selection of essays--including "Yosemite Glaciers," "God's First Temples," "Snow-Storm on Mount Shasta," "The American Forests," and the late appeal "Save the Redwoods"--highlighting various aspects of his career: his exploration of the Grand Canyon and of what became Yosemite and Yellowstone national parks, his successful crusades to preserve the wilderness, his early walking tour to Florida, and the Alaska journey of 1879.

  • Promoting young people's access to social rights as a means for their inclusion and participation in society!

    In and around many cities, social and economic imbalances have led to the development of disadvantaged neighbourhoods, where diversity is also accompanied by poverty and often marginalisation or exclusion. This is sometimes combined with different forms and levels of de facto social segregation, discrimination and violence.

    At times of economic and social crisis, feelings of powerlessness and anxiety about the future risk deepening local tensions and underlying conflicts. Young people are often at the centre of these tensions because they are more vulnerable and insecure, and because they are more directly affected by uncertainties regarding the development of their autonomy, as well as participation in society and contribution to its development.

    The Council of Europe has challenged itself to respond to these situations by adopting recommendations for its member states that encourage and support them in finding adequate policy responses to situations of exclusion, discrimination and violence affecting young people in disadvantaged neighbourhoods. In early 2015, the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe adopted a policy recommendation with proposals for policy measures to member states in order to promote access to social rights for young people.

    Proposals concern:
    - the provision of accessible, affordable public services;
    - overcoming segregation;
    - promoting the participation of young people;
    - combating discrimination;
    - recognition of youth work and non-formal education;
    - promoting gender-sensitive approaches to the elaboration of youth policies.

    This publication is an accompaniment to this recommendation, and aims to bring its content closer to policy makers, youth work practitioners, youth organisations and youth workers, and provide step-by-step information and guidance on the implementation of the recommendation. The publication also offers advice and examples of actions to take and policies to develop so that the social rights of young people are taken seriously by all the actors concerned by social inclusion and social cohesion.

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